Pella physician accused of incompetence ordered to pay $2,500

A Pella physician accused by state licensing authorities of professional incompetence has agreed to pay $2,500 to settle allegations of inappropriate pain management. (Photo via Nevada State Board of Medical Examiners)

A Pella physician accused of professional incompetence has agreed to pay $2,500 to settle allegations of inappropriate pain management.

The Iowa Board of Medicine has alleged that Dr. Gregory L. Ingle, a 67-year-old family-practice physician, provided pain-management care to multiple patients that “fell below minimum acceptable standards.” Ingle has agreed to pay a $2,500 civil penalty and complete a board-approved opioid-prescribing course and a record-keeping course.

The board has also placed Ingle on probation for a period of five years, subject to board monitoring. The case against Ingle was initiated in 2019.

Board restores physicians’ licenses

In other recent board news, the board restored the license of Dr. Vuong A. Nayima, a 36-year-old physician who practices internal medicine in in West Des Moines.

In August 2020, Nayima entered into a settlement agreement with the board after it alleged he prescribed controlled substances to his romantic partner and staff in his medical offices without establishing physician-patient relationships, and without charting and documenting the care he provided.

As part of a settlement, the board issued Nayima a warning and ordered him to complete a board-approved professional ethics program and a mental health medical management course. On April 15, the board determined Nayima had successfully completed the terms of his agreement and his Iowa medical license was returned to full privileges, free and clear of any restrictions.

The board also restored the license of Dr. Larry J. Standing, a 56-year-old physician who practices general medicine in Cedar Falls. In February 2017, the board alleged that Standing failed to provide appropriate pain management to multiple patients in Cedar Falls between 2011 and 2016.

As part of a settlement with the board, Standing was issued a warning and ordered to pay a $5,000 civil penalty and complete an approved record-keeping course. The board also prohibited Standing from prescribing, administering or dispensing controlled substances for the treatment of chronic pain and placed him on probation for a period of five years subject to board monitoring.

On April 15, the board determined Standing had fully complied with the agreement and his Iowa medical license was returned to full privileges, free and clear of all restrictions.

 

Clark Kauffman
Deputy Editor Clark Kauffman has worked during the past 30 years as both an investigative reporter and editorial writer at two of Iowa’s largest newspapers, the Des Moines Register and the Quad-City Times. He has won numerous state and national awards for reporting and editorial writing. His 2004 series on prosecutorial misconduct in Iowa was named a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting. From October 2018 through November 2019, Kauffman was an assistant ombudsman for the Iowa Office of Ombudsman, an agency that investigates citizens’ complaints of wrongdoing within state and local government agencies.