Author

Morgan Marietta

Morgan Marietta

Morgan Marietta is an associate professor of political science at University of Massachusetts Lowell. He studies the political consequences of belief. He is the author of four books, "The Politics of Sacred Rhetoric: Absolutist Appeals and Political Influence," "A Citizen’s Guide to American Ideology," "A Citizen’s Guide to the Constitution and the Supreme Court," and most recently "One Nation, Two Realities: Dueling Facts in American Democracy," published by Oxford University Press. He and Bert Rockman are the co-editors of the "Citizen Guides to Politics & Public Affairs" from Routledge Press, and he is editor of the annual SCOTUS series at Palgrave Macmillan on the major decisions of the Supreme Court. He and David Barker write the Inconvenient Facts blog at Psychology Today.

COMMENTARY

Supreme Court unanimously upholds religious liberty over LGBTQ rights – and nods to a bigger win for conservatives ahead

By: - June 19, 2021

It wasn’t a dramatic expansion of religious rights — not yet. But the Supreme Court’s ruling in favor of a Catholic adoption agency that had been excluded from Philadelphia’s foster programs for refusing to work with same-sex couples will be consequential. It suggests that when the broader question of whether religious groups have the right […]

COMMENTARY

Biden wins – scholars on what it means for race relations, U.S. foreign policy and the Supreme Court

By: , and - November 8, 2020

The American public has had its say and for the first time in a generation denied a sitting president a second term. President’s Trump’s tenure lasted just four years, but in that time he dragged policy on an array of key issues in a dramatic new direction. Joe Biden’s victory, confirmed by the Associated Press […]

COMMENTARY

Supreme Court to decide the future of the Electoral College

By: - June 17, 2020

Many Americans are surprised to learn that in U.S. presidential elections, the members of the Electoral College do not necessarily have to pick the candidate the voters in their state favored. Or do they? This month the Supreme Court will rule on the independent powers of electors, which will determine the meaning of the Electoral […]